Reflections of a Passing Day

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The Western Horseman Cover - Reflections of a Passing DayTIM COX ART ON THE COVER OF THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF WESTERN HORSEMAN MAGAZINE

We were very honored for Tim to have been asked to create the cover of the 75th Anniversary edition of Western Horseman. "Reflections of a Passing Day" marked the return of artwork to the magazine after several years of using photographs on the covers. Tim’s work first appeared in Western Horseman in 1981, and it has been on The Western Horseman cover 13 times since then. He has also had several feature stories with them.

“It meant a lot to me to be asked to do this cover. I have always felt I owed something to the magazine for furthering my art career, and I was happy to return that loyalty and share it with the readers.”

“I worked hard to connect the cowboy to the future,” Cox says. “There are going to always be ties to the past. I also wanted to express the peace and tranquility of the Western lifestyle and a sense of calm with horses in the background and warm colors.”

Jennifer Denison of WH wrote: “Notice that the cowboy’s face is partially hidden. Cox intentionally created a nondescript cowboy so that viewers can see themselves in the scene and reflect on what they’ve seen and done in their lives.”

“If I put a face on the subject, viewers tend to look at the face and not put themselves in the scene,” Cox explains. “Also, you don’t know if the cowboy is a cutter, rancher or team roper. I want everyone to relate to him, whether they’re trainers, trail riders or everyday horse-lovers.”

Creating a composition that would work on a fold-out cover was the biggest challenge Cox faced when creating this painting. Since the piece would be for sale at the 45th annual Cowboys Artists of the America Sale & Exhibition in Phoenix, Arizona, he needed to not only paint something that would fit the cover format but would also be of reasonable size, subject matter and style to which his collectors are accustomed.

“I feel like I’m painting history,” he says. “In the future I hope people will look back on my paintings and see how it was, like I do now, with works by Charles Russell and Frederic Remington.”

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